Author Topic: The term derby in football  (Read 4919 times)

Winging It

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The term derby in football
« on: August 28, 2015, 08:00:46 PM »
Like it or not,  tomorrow IS a derby game !  For some of us to dismiss it, or them the opponents as worthy derby opposition comes across as a bit snobbish.

The term derby's definition is as follows - Games between two rivals of close geographical proximity are usually called a local derby, or simply just derby.  A sporting fixture between two teams from the same town, city or region, particularly in association football.   

As there are no other league rivals from this County then of course they are the rivals and derby opponents.  Really does baffle my why people still harp on about this when the simple fact remains...that it is such a game.  Its time we put this debate to bed and accept the truth.

kodger

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2015, 08:50:01 PM »
I thought you were going to explain the term..'derby'..all these decades watching football and I still don't know.

Winging It

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2015, 09:09:12 PM »
I thought you were going to explain the term..'derby'..all these decades watching football and I still don't know.

Second paragraph  :bunny

shorty2kuk

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2015, 10:23:57 PM »
Like it or not,  tomorrow IS a derby game !  For some of us to dismiss it, or them the opponents as worthy derby opposition comes across as a bit snobbish.

The term derby's definition is as follows - Games between two rivals of close geographical proximity are usually called a local derby, or simply just derby.  A sporting fixture between two teams from the same town, city or region, particularly in association football.   

As there are no other league rivals from this County then of course they are the rivals and derby opponents.  Really does baffle my why people still harp on about this when the simple fact remains...that it is such a game.  Its time we put this debate to bed and accept the truth.

Not a derby. Corby is closer to boston

Winging It

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2015, 10:39:13 PM »
Like it or not,  tomorrow IS a derby game !  For some of us to dismiss it, or them the opponents as worthy derby opposition comes across as a bit snobbish.

The term derby's definition is as follows - Games between two rivals of close geographical proximity are usually called a local derby, or simply just derby.  A sporting fixture between two teams from the same town, city or region, particularly in association football.   

As there are no other league rivals from this County then of course they are the rivals and derby opponents.  Really does baffle my why people still harp on about this when the simple fact remains...that it is such a game.  Its time we put this debate to bed and accept the truth.

Not a derby. Corby is closer to boston

Corby is in Northhamptonshire,  so not a derby !  And both sit around 55 miles from Boston so there is no difference in distance. A derby is all about local rivalry,  local as in Lincolnshire !

poshpilgrim

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #5 on: August 29, 2015, 12:05:04 AM »
Who really gives a shit :P. Gainsborough trinity we're coming for you!

Pilgrim86

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #6 on: August 29, 2015, 12:21:07 AM »
Like it or not,  tomorrow IS a derby game !  For some of us to dismiss it, or them the opponents as worthy derby opposition comes across as a bit snobbish.

The term derby's definition is as follows - Games between two rivals of close geographical proximity are usually called a local derby, or simply just derby.  A sporting fixture between two teams from the same town, city or region, particularly in association football.   

As there are no other league rivals from this County then of course they are the rivals and derby opponents.  Really does baffle my why people still harp on about this when the simple fact remains...that it is such a game.  Its time we put this debate to bed and accept the truth.

Not a derby. Corby is closer to boston

Corby is in Northhamptonshire,  so not a derby !  And both sit around 55 miles from Boston so there is no difference in distance. A derby is all about local rivalry,  local as in Lincolnshire !
So if we played Grimsby Borough, is that a derby? Appleby Frodingham? Barton Town Old Boys?
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Johnny Pilgrim

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #7 on: August 29, 2015, 07:36:56 AM »
Like it or not,  tomorrow IS a derby game !  For some of us to dismiss it, or them the opponents as worthy derby opposition comes across as a bit snobbish.

The term derby's definition is as follows - Games between two rivals of close geographical proximity are usually called a local derby, or simply just derby.  A sporting fixture between two teams from the same town, city or region, particularly in association football.   

As there are no other league rivals from this County then of course they are the rivals and derby opponents.  Really does baffle my why people still harp on about this when the simple fact remains...that it is such a game.  Its time we put this debate to bed and accept the truth.

Not a derby. Corby is closer to boston


Wyberton is even closer...


Winging It

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2015, 07:51:22 AM »
Like it or not,  tomorrow IS a derby game !  For some of us to dismiss it, or them the opponents as worthy derby opposition comes across as a bit snobbish.

The term derby's definition is as follows - Games between two rivals of close geographical proximity are usually called a local derby, or simply just derby.  A sporting fixture between two teams from the same town, city or region, particularly in association football.   

As there are no other league rivals from this County then of course they are the rivals and derby opponents.  Really does baffle my why people still harp on about this when the simple fact remains...that it is such a game.  Its time we put this debate to bed and accept the truth.

Not a derby. Corby is closer to boston


Wyberton is even closer...

Has they been in the same league then yes, but who's the local rivals in our league and hence the derby game ?  As i've previously stated,  i have assisted with the correct terms meaning according to google so we just have to accept it even if we don't want to see those minnows from north of the county as close rivals and derby opponents.

This debate is almost as tedious as calling the team yellows when we play in amber !

wez33

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2015, 08:37:40 AM »
I'd call it local but definitely not worthy of the phrase Derby, they bring 26 fans...

whydidyousaythat?

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2015, 07:38:59 PM »
Who really gives a shit :P. Gainsborough trinity we're coming for you!
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Lord Cutler Knobhead

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Re: The term derby in football
« Reply #11 on: August 29, 2015, 09:19:11 PM »
It's a local away game, for it to be a derby from me I'd have to look for it when the fixtures come out.

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