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Messages - Adam

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31
The B-Ark / Re: The Quadrant for sale.
« on: October 05, 2016, 12:07:44 PM »
Err, weren't the Chestnuts always very clear that they would not be owning, building and operating all of the parts of the Quadrant themselves?

Looks like they're getting on with the process of selling on various sites where appropriate. Reassuring progress, so far as I can see.

32
The B-Ark / Re: Bostons MP.
« on: July 02, 2016, 01:59:58 PM »
Matt will have another decision to make with the election of a new leader coming up .

Boris is a character some like and some despise .  I,M sure Matt will reveal which candidate he,s backing .
Back Boris and he will upset some of his constituents .
NOT back Boris and he will upset a different segment of his constituents .

A bit easier for Matt now that Boris has gone .

Stephen Phillips MP(Sleaford) has quickly come out to back Mrs May ,  will Matt follow ?.

Seems like a well planned plot to stab Boris in the back .
Seems odd that a private email between Grove and his wife (a Daily Mail columnist) got leaked .
Gove stabs Johnson in the back .
The Daily Mail who backed leave and employs Mrs Gove backs Mrs May who was a remainer .

Mrs May known to been leaning towards  Brexit before the referendum,  quietly declaring herself a remainer but all the time during the campaign reminded virtually silent .

Seems like a well worked out scheme which may see Gove standing down for May to walk into the job . A declared remainer who will happily implement Leave proposals .

Matts best bet is to back Teressa May .

Would,nt  trust Gove or Boris to do the job .

I did,nt see a copy of the email between Gove and his wife and don,t want to do .

But,  if anyone can get hold of a copy of an email from Boris to his wife I would be pleased to see it .  :)

I wouldn't have a jot of sympathy for Boris - he campaigned for leave purely to further his own career, in the expectation that Remain would prevail but he would be a hero amongst Eurosceptic Tory members and therefore inherit the leadership from Cameron in 2019/2020. After years of economic growth, the deficit eliminated and Corbyn still in charge of Labour he would then win an enormous majority. You could see in his speech last Friday he had no appetite to clear up the mess he has created, and Gove stabbing him in the front tipped him over the edge and made him withdraw. As a remainer, it's grimly satisfying to see his career in tatters as well, but it's a Pyrrhic victory.

Looks like May will take on the poisoned chalice now. She is by far the least bad option, in my view. What I would give for a credible Labour Party led by the elder Miliband...

33
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 29, 2016, 11:06:25 AM »
What is fast developing as a matter of concern to me is the type of out that we are about to get. As I see it , we may be offered 1) just a bit out - we didn't really mean it, 2) not really out - give us all the perks, 3) please don't let us leave - find a way to stop it, and 4) ever so sorry - we didn't mean it and it's time for us to adopt the euro.

I voted for out. Out means out. we really need to sever all ties and start again. It will soon become clear which matters are of mutual benefit to us and the Eu, and where it is not obvious, we need to take a step back and look at our global position. Whatever the future, I am convinced that the politicians are planning to sell us down the river, and I fear that the river may be the Styx.

It really depends on the new PM, and what deal he/she gets from the EU. Jeremy Hunt has already intimated today he will seek to retain freedom of movement within the EEA. Boris, after his shambles of a column yesterday in which he suggested he could retain EEA membership AND bring in a points system (impossible) has today backtracked and said, no, he will definitely curtail freedom of movement. This will mean quitting the single market, which means we'll need to negotiate a separate trade deal with the EU. It is evident that this will be nowhere near as good as the deal we have now, but we will at least be free to then negotiate trade deals with non-EU countries as a sovereign nation. These normally take at least five years, so once you've factored in the two year negotiation period when we'll still be part of the EU, the earliest we will start experiencing the full benefits - if there are any - of the freedom Brexit affords us will be sometime after 2023. I'd say a more realistic target is 2025 and beyond.

I don't think there's any way in which we will leave the Common market - it would be complete economic meltdown. Any Tory PM will surely listen to the City which will be holding a gun to his or her head.

There probably is scope for the 'Norway plus' deal - with some very minor restrictions on freedom of movement. But that's still essentially a crap version of EU membership. To be honest, I think the next PM and the EU will probably end up hammering a deal which keeps us in. The EU has a history of second referendums, and both sides have a huge amount to gain compared to the current state of the world. The EU will need to weigh up the fact that striking such a deal might encourage flouncing by other countries - but that not striking one means losing their strongest military power and 2nd largest economy. I think the latter concern might win out. Maybe I'm being deliriously optimistic because the alternative is so hopeless...

These articles in the FT and Indie make the argument better than I do.

Adam .
A reminder that you have overlooked responding to  my question to you on a previous post .

My questions on previous posts requesting you to elaborate on your Brexit effect comments on pensionsers.
Also your suggestion on state pension cut,  how do you suggest this is done and on what scale .?

Recessions don't affect pensioners in the same way because you can't be made redundant from an annuity.

I'm not sure - much like the average Brexiteer I haven't thought the idea through very much. How about in proportion to how much HMRC's tax receipts fall in the recession we're about to see? So if the tax take falls 5%, pensions fall 5%. Fair?

34
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 28, 2016, 10:27:37 PM »
What is fast developing as a matter of concern to me is the type of out that we are about to get. As I see it , we may be offered 1) just a bit out - we didn't really mean it, 2) not really out - give us all the perks, 3) please don't let us leave - find a way to stop it, and 4) ever so sorry - we didn't mean it and it's time for us to adopt the euro.

I voted for out. Out means out. we really need to sever all ties and start again. It will soon become clear which matters are of mutual benefit to us and the Eu, and where it is not obvious, we need to take a step back and look at our global position. Whatever the future, I am convinced that the politicians are planning to sell us down the river, and I fear that the river may be the Styx.

It really depends on the new PM, and what deal he/she gets from the EU. Jeremy Hunt has already intimated today he will seek to retain freedom of movement within the EEA. Boris, after his shambles of a column yesterday in which he suggested he could retain EEA membership AND bring in a points system (impossible) has today backtracked and said, no, he will definitely curtail freedom of movement. This will mean quitting the single market, which means we'll need to negotiate a separate trade deal with the EU. It is evident that this will be nowhere near as good as the deal we have now, but we will at least be free to then negotiate trade deals with non-EU countries as a sovereign nation. These normally take at least five years, so once you've factored in the two year negotiation period when we'll still be part of the EU, the earliest we will start experiencing the full benefits - if there are any - of the freedom Brexit affords us will be sometime after 2023. I'd say a more realistic target is 2025 and beyond.

I don't think there's any way in which we will leave the Common market - it would be complete economic meltdown. Any Tory PM will surely listen to the City which will be holding a gun to his or her head.

There probably is scope for the 'Norway plus' deal - with some very minor restrictions on freedom of movement. But that's still essentially a crap version of EU membership. To be honest, I think the next PM and the EU will probably end up hammering a deal which keeps us in. The EU has a history of second referendums, and both sides have a huge amount to gain compared to the current state of the world. The EU will need to weigh up the fact that striking such a deal might encourage flouncing by other countries - but that not striking one means losing their strongest military power and 2nd largest economy. I think the latter concern might win out. Maybe I'm being deliriously optimistic because the alternative is so hopeless...

These articles in the FT and Indie make the argument better than I do.

35
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 27, 2016, 10:43:39 AM »
We have our nation back. We must fight against all who attempt to overturn democracy. They ask what is our plan? It is to replace the European laws that we wish to continue with, by passing acts to make it so, and to reject those which we do not wish to continue with. Then we get on with governing the nation. I think that will do for now. What we are offered is blood, toil, tears and sweat (apologies to Sir Winston), but we will emerge into the sunlight of the Britain (historically England) that has been our way of life for the best part of a thousand years. We have always opposed the overpowering force of the strongest power in Europe by backing the second strongest. This way, we keep Europe under control, although Louis XIV, Napoleon and Hitler temporarily gave us problems.

I fear that any attempt to overturn a democratic decision, by whatever means, will result in blood letting on a level that has not been seen in our nation certainly since the act of settlement, and probably much longer. We must move forward and educate the younger generation who cannot remember what it means to be in charge of our own country, and do business with the rest of the world (including Europe). If we have decent products and services to sell, the world will buy. Don't let anyone convince you that the vote was a mistake. It was the saving of a nation, and I have the temerity to suggest, the saving of the 21st Century World.

I don't know how old you are, but I'm not sure if that country as you remember it ever really existed. It's natural to always look back at the past with rose tinted glasses. Certainly in my studies of history and reading literature from the time, things weren't all that great.

Even if that place you remember so fondly did exist, it doesn't any more, we live in a completely different world to the one we did 50 years ago. We can either choose to embrace that and be a major player, or we can go off and bury our heads in the sand.

The world is a global place now and, although a still a great nation, we are not the great power we once were. The Aneeicans, the Chinese, and now the EU, may listen to us but in the end they will do what is in their own best interests and we will be powerless to stop them. As part of the EU, we were a strong influence within a large block of nations and had a great deal more collective bargaining power.

We have to look forwards not backwards if we are going to continue to be a great nation.

I heard the 70s were great. Our economy - based on mining and the manufacturing of terrible cars - generated so much wealth that we were able to go down to a three day working week!

36
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 26, 2016, 12:19:56 PM »
Statistics are being bandied about on the breakdown of the vote re age groups.
I can't recall seeing an age thing on my slip.
Secondly, apparently young people are moaning that older people have "taken their future"
I ask them "would you want to walk through a minefield first or second"?
We've been through it....
Little doubt that they grey vote made a big contribution at Boston ,  maybe someone (maybe Adam) can explain why us present day oldies got it all  wrong and those only just entering adulthood seem to know the answers to a very complex emerging part our history , a subject even the experts disagree on .   

If there was  another referendum what action could be taken to get the correct outcome .

  1 .  Ban the over 60s voting

  2    Declare the negative vote the winner .      i.e .   in  52out    48 stay vote,  declare the 48 vote the winner .

I feel it's the wrong decision because it has put at peril Britain's place in the world's biggest single common market - which in 2016 our economy is deeply intertwined with and dependent upon. This vote has led to the resignation of a very competent Prime Minister - to be replaced by either Boris Johnson (who clearly didn't actually want or expect this result and has no clue whatsoever what to do about it), or Jeremy Corbyn (who has no clue whatsoever about anything, at all). The second largest constituent nation of the UK is likely to accede (who can blame them?), and we are faced with either erecting a land border around our fourth nation or it also acceding. Oh, I may also shortly lose the right to live and work freely across 27 different nations - should I have wished to do so - and many of my friends from abroad are considering leaving the country. The impact of 'making our own laws' is actually that we have to rewrite 40 years of legislation over boring but essential things like product standards - basically replacing European red tape with British red tape and ensuring that businesses have to meet two sets rather than one if they wish to sell abroad.

A year ago Great Britain had the fastest growing economy in the Western world. Now we have no leadership,fewer friends and no bloody clue where we'll be in five years time.

Happy Independence Day!

Odd that you keep giving us long sermon,s about a very complex subject yet when I put a simple question to you that only needs a short answer you fail to respond !!!   what is your response to my clear question ?

Judging on your comments re Cameron I think it,s time to change your spin doctor .

Your question was why do I think Brexit is the wrong call. My response was that - amongst other things - the country is now utterly rudderless with no effective government, our economy is going to be deeply wounded, the United Kingdom itself is likely to break up and I may lose the freedom to live and work across Europe. If you still can't digest that, then I'm sorry - it's not possible to simplify it any more. Or perhaps you think these are good things?

And 'long sermon'? It was one paragraph...

37
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 25, 2016, 10:02:57 PM »
Statistics are being bandied about on the breakdown of the vote re age groups.
I can't recall seeing an age thing on my slip.
Secondly, apparently young people are moaning that older people have "taken their future"
I ask them "would you want to walk through a minefield first or second"?
We've been through it....
Little doubt that they grey vote made a big contribution at Boston ,  maybe someone (maybe Adam) can explain why us present day oldies got it all  wrong and those only just entering adulthood seem to know the answers to a very complex emerging part our history , a subject even the experts disagree on .   

If there was  another referendum what action could be taken to get the correct outcome .

  1 .  Ban the over 60s voting

  2    Declare the negative vote the winner .      i.e .   in  52out    48 stay vote,  declare the 48 vote the winner .

I feel it's the wrong decision because it has put at peril Britain's place in the world's biggest single common market - which in 2016 our economy is deeply intertwined with and dependent upon. This vote has led to the resignation of a very competent Prime Minister - to be replaced by either Boris Johnson (who clearly didn't actually want or expect this result and has no clue whatsoever what to do about it), or Jeremy Corbyn (who has no clue whatsoever about anything, at all). The second largest constituent nation of the UK is likely to accede (who can blame them?), and we are faced with either erecting a land border around our fourth nation or it also acceding. Oh, I may also shortly lose the right to live and work freely across 27 different nations - should I have wished to do so - and many of my friends from abroad are considering leaving the country. The impact of 'making our own laws' is actually that we have to rewrite 40 years of legislation over boring but essential things like product standards - basically replacing European red tape with British red tape and ensuring that businesses have to meet two sets rather than one if they wish to sell abroad.

A year ago Great Britain had the fastest growing economy in the Western world. Now we have no leadership,fewer friends and no bloody clue where we'll be in five years time.

Happy Independence Day!

38
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 25, 2016, 07:18:47 PM »
Truth is i fear a re vote will completly send the markets and pound into meltdown, The reaction yesterday morning showed the market dont like new things facing them, the fact it finished up on a 7 day  line showed that once the market had settled into knowing the choice was made and the BOE was ready for it then it becomes buisness as normal.

To be honest, there's little point trying to read into the markets on an intra-day reaction basis in any case (though there will no doubt be plenty of roller coaster days to come). The effects are more likely to show through a prolonged stagnation/gradual fall, when the counter factual would have been a strong and growing economy. We probably won't know what the 'real' value of sterling would be, because I'm not sure the Bank of England will let it be known how much of its reserves it will use to support the pound.

But the effects on the economy will be very real. It's 2016: people have jobs working for firms which have offices in the UK and Europe. Working fluidly across the offices - having teams comprised of people in London and Brussels - providing services to clients in Copenhagen - is part of their culture. These companies are in complete shellshock, because that business model might just cease to be a possibility very soon. People don't realise - or don't care - how intertwined our economy is with Europe. Or many just don't care - but that is perhaps even sadder, because such people tend to be those who recessions hit in the harshest way.

The only way to avoid real damage is if we stay a member of the EEA. On one hand, I'd be happy with it - because it avoids trashing the country completely (we might even cling on to Scotland), but on another it is desperately sad, as we will have achieved precisely nothing other than a downgrading of our current membership status and a lessening of our status in the world. It would send leave voters and Nigel Farage utterly apoplectic, which is both a hilarious and scary prospect (scary because it risks violence).

Incidentally, has anyone got any idea how the feck we're actually going to enact this - given the enormous pro-Remain majority in the House of Commons? If Labour can manage to get rid of Corbyn and replace him with a vaguely animate human being, it's easy to see a coalition of them, the Lib Dems and the SNP being formed after a General Election. A year ago, I hated the prospect of such a coalition, but I'd give an awful lot for it now.

39
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 25, 2016, 01:52:55 PM »
Boris seemed strangely subdued at the Vote Leave press conference earlier. It's almost as if he didn't actually expect Brexit to happen and only chose to campaign for it for the sake of him becoming PM one day. Perhaps October, with the UK on the edge of breaking up and the economy paralysed by uncertainty is not exactly what he had in mind...

Also, we're probably going to need to make some cuts. I damn well hope they start with the state pension.


Vindictive non democratic prat.

I'm not even sure whether to take it as an insult Mel - as Churchill once said, the best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter. The words have never rang truer than they have in the last couple of days...

40
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 25, 2016, 09:20:13 AM »
In all honesty I wasn't that bothered. Freedom of speech and all that.

41
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 25, 2016, 08:28:01 AM »
Boris seemed strangely subdued at the Vote Leave press conference earlier. It's almost as if he didn't actually expect Brexit to happen and only chose to campaign for it for the sake of him becoming PM one day. Perhaps October, with the UK on the edge of breaking up and the economy paralysed by uncertainty is not exactly what he had in mind...

Also, we're probably going to need to make some cuts. I damn well hope they start with the state pension.

The debate on this board  has been going on for several weeks.  And that last statement is the most offensive I have seen.

First, let me state I do not receive a state pension.  But those that do, have PAID into the pension system, it is their right.

Also some collecting the pension fought for the right for you to speak freely.

What happened yesterday was the people of Britain saying enough is enough, not just pensioners as you are inferring.

You have always been an arrogant little s**t and that last statement proves that.

Are you still at uni ?  If so, join the real world.

Sorry Ken, remove if you want, but that statement was out of order.

Well if I made the point too bluntly, apologies. It's a view based on more than just a knee jerk reaction to this outcome - the pension has been just about the one item of government spending to rise in real terms over the last six years, whereas everything else has been cut back. Given that age demographic tend to be richer than most, I think that is both indefensible and unsustainable and it should have been frozen in real terms. It's the grey vote that is dragging us out of the EU, yet they seem the ones who will have to deal with the consequences least - young people are utterly fed up with the legacy they are being bequeathed.

For the record, no, I've been working for two years. In a job which I'm not extremely worried about - because in the real world our economy is highly reliant on trade and cooperation with the continent that we have just decided to tear ourselves away from.

42
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 25, 2016, 12:35:43 AM »
Boris seemed strangely subdued at the Vote Leave press conference earlier. It's almost as if he didn't actually expect Brexit to happen and only chose to campaign for it for the sake of him becoming PM one day. Perhaps October, with the UK on the edge of breaking up and the economy paralysed by uncertainty is not exactly what he had in mind...

Also, we're probably going to need to make some cuts. I damn well hope they start with the state pension.

43
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 24, 2016, 11:39:41 AM »

44
The B-Ark / Re: National League considering changes to play-offs
« on: June 20, 2016, 01:13:21 PM »

45
The B-Ark / Re: O/T In or out
« on: June 15, 2016, 11:49:06 PM »
Very much along the lines of the 'don't believe a word of it' is this from Boris - whichever way the wind blows!
https://t.co/s08o9nTl8s

In short he is out for his own personal gain (shot at being PM) so the guy is a complete bandwagon jumper.  With Gove just in behind to pick up the scraps.

I absolutely detest how politicians and business leaders alike are playing so fast and loose with the economy and the faith voters have in democracy to either climb the greasy pole or get headlines.  Sadly not surprised by it though.

As a general rule, I think the 'all politicians are self-interested careerists' and 'Tories hate everyone but the rich' lines are grossly exaggerated.

But Boris really is a special case - a Category A charlatan.  At least Gove and Farage are just good old fashioned fruitloops.

Will be interesting to see just how permanent any leave vote is. If leave get 51% and the economy promptly goes into free fall, I imagine the polls would quickly swing 60/40 back to remain. There's then a question of if a second referendum is appropriate. I guess if Cameron has been replaced by Boris by then there is no prospect of that actually being held.

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